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Oldassgeek

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About Oldassgeek

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    Level 10

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    Overwatch

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  1. 3 downloads

    This reshade mod will make your Conan Exiles look sharper and more vibrant giving you more details. This reshade mod using reshade.me will make your Conan Exiles look sharper and more vibrant giving you more details. I'm still trying to figure out how to update to the latest version of reshade.me without BattleEye blocking the .dll file. Instructions: Unzip the archive in steam/steamapss/common/conanexiles/conansandbox/binaries/win64 Open opengl32.ini with any text editor and change D:\ to your Steam directory. For example, if your steam is located at C:\Games\Steam you should change D:\ to C:\ and add Games\ in game press Numpad 1 to activate or deactivate the reshade, and if you want to make changes press SHIFT + F2 IMPORTANT: don't deactivate the mod while you are in a Battleeye server or it will detect and block the reshade, sending you back to the game main menu. If you want to see the difference between mod on and mod off try it in SOLO. To unistall delete all the files you have unzipped in: steam/steamapss/common/conanexiles/conansandbox/binaries/win64 Credit: Credit goes to the original author of the ini settings to which I only made some small changes and the reshade.me staff.

    Free

  2. Version 3.0.5

    0 downloads

    Minion is a premium addon manager for World of Warcraft and The Elder Scrolls Online. It can manage all your addons without even going to the hosted website. Download popular, most downloaded, best rated and more directly from the manager. You can also view description and screenshots without going to the addons respective website. Features: Automatic AddOn updates! Fast downloads. Easy to install & browse Addons from Minion. Support for multiple game installs. One click update all. Easy AddOn management. Safe from Virus, Malware and keyloggers.

    Free

  3. Oldassgeek

    How Time Travel Works

    Page 1/7 - From millennium-skipping Victorians to phone booth-hopping teenagers, the term time travel often summons our most fantastic visions of what it means to move through the fourth dimension. But of course you don’t need a time machine or a fancy wormhole to jaunt through the years. As you’ve probably noticed, we’re all constantly engaged in the act of time travel. At its most basic level, time is the rate of change in the universe — and like it or not, we are constantly undergoing change. We age, the planets move around the sun, and things fall apart. We measure the passage of time in seconds, minutes, hours and years, but this doesn’t mean time flows at a constant rate. Just as the water in a river rushes or slows depending on the size of the channel, time flows at different rates in different places. In other words, time is relative. But what causes this fluctuation along our one-way trek from the cradle to the grave? It all comes down to the relationship between time and space. Human beings frolic about in the three spatial dimensions of length, width and depth. Time joins the party as that most crucial fourth dimension. Time can’t exist without space, and space can’t exist without time. The two exist as one: the space-time continuum. Any event that occurs in the universe has to involve both space and time. Discuss Time Travel in our forums Page 2/7: Time Travel Into the Future If you want to advance through the years a little faster than the next person, you’ll need to exploit space-time. Global positioning satellites pull this off every day, accruing an extra third-of-a-billionth of a second daily. Time passes faster in orbit, because satellites are farther away from the mass of the Earth. Down here on the surface, the planet’s mass drags on time and slows it down in small measures. We call this effect gravitational time dilation. According to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, gravity is a curve in space-time and astronomers regularly observe this phenomenon when they study light moving near a sufficiently massive object. Particularly large suns, for instance, can cause an otherwise straight beam of light to curve in what we call the gravitational lensing effect. What does this have to do with time? Remember: Any event that occurs in the universe has to involve both space and time. Gravity doesn’t just pull on space; it also pulls on time. You wouldn’t be able to notice minute changes in the flow of time, but a sufficiently massive object would make a huge difference — say, like the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A at the center of our galaxy. Here, the mass of 4 million suns exists as a single, infinitely dense point, known as a singularity [source: NASA]. Circle this black hole for a while (without falling in) and you’d experience time at half the Earth rate. In other words, you’d round out a five-year journey to discover an entire decade had passed on Earth [source: Davies]. Speed also plays a role in the rate at which we experience time. Time passes more slowly the closer you approach the unbreakable cosmic speed limit we call the speed of light. For instance, the hands of a clock in a speeding train move more slowly than those of a stationary clock. A human passenger wouldn’t feel the difference, but at the end of the trip the speeding clock would be slowed by billionths of a second. If such a train could attain 99.999 percent of light speed, only one year would pass onboard for every 223 years back at the train station [source: Davies]. In effect, this hypothetical commuter would have traveled into the future. But what about the past? Could the fastest starship imaginable turn back the clock? Page 3/7: Time Travel Into the Past We’ve established that time travel into the future happens all the time. Scientists have proven it in experiments, and the idea is a fundamental aspect of Einstein’s theory of relativity. You’ll make it to the future; it’s just a question of how fast the trip will be. But what about travel into the past? A glance into the night sky should supply an answer. The Milky Way galaxy is roughly 100,000 light-years wide, so light from its more distant stars can take thousands upon thousands of years to reach Earth. Glimpse that light, and you’re essentially looking back in time. When astronomers measure the cosmic microwave background radiation, they stare back more than 10 billion years into a primordial cosmic age. But can we do better than this? There’s nothing in Einstein’s theory that precludes time travel into the past, but the very premise of pushing a button and going back to yesterday violates the law of causality, or cause and effect. One event happens in our universe, and it leads to yet another in an endless one-way string of events. In every instance, the cause occurs before the effect. Just try to imagine a different reality, say, in which a murder victim dies of his or her gunshot wound before being shot. It violates reality as we know it; thus, many scientists dismiss time travel into the past as an impossibility. Some scientists have proposed the idea of using faster-than-light travel to journey back in time. After all, if time slows as an object approaches the speed of light, then might exceeding that speed cause time to flow backward? Of course, as an object nears the speed of light, its relativistic mass increases until, at the speed of light, it becomes infinite. Accelerating an infinite mass any faster than that is impossible. Warp speed technology could theoretically cheat the universal speed limit by propelling a bubble of space-time across the universe, but even this would come with colossal, far-future energy costs. But what if time travel into the past and future depends less on speculative space propulsion technology and more on existing cosmic phenomena? Set a course for the black hole. Page 4/7: Black Holes and Kerr Rings Circle a black hole long enough, and gravitational time dilation will take you into the future. But what would happen if you flew right into the maw of this cosmic titan? Most scientists agree the black hole would probably crush you, but one unique variety of black hole might not: the Kerr black hole or Kerr ring. In 1963, New Zealand mathematician Roy Kerr proposed the first realistic theory for a rotating black hole. The concept hinges on neutron stars, which are massive collapsed stars the size of Manhattan but with the mass of Earth’s sun [source: Kaku]. Kerr postulated that if dying stars collapsed into a rotating ring of neutron stars, their centrifugal force would prevent them from turning into a singularity. Since the black hole wouldn’t have a singularity, Kerr believed it would be safe to enter without fear of the infinite gravitational force at its center. If Kerr black holes exist, scientists speculate that we might pass through them and exit through a white hole. Think of this as the exhaust end of a black hole. Instead of pulling everything into its gravitational force, the white hole would push everything out and away from it — perhaps into another time or even another universe. Kerr black holes are purely theoretical, but if they do exist they offer the adventurous time traveler a one-way trip into the past or future. And while a tremendously advanced civilization might develop a means of calibrating such a method of time travel, there’s no telling where or when a “wild” Kerr black hole might leave you. Page 5/7: Wormholes Theoretical Kerr black holes aren’t the only possible cosmic shortcut to the past or future. As made popular by everything from “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” to “Donnie Darko,” there’s also the equally theoretical Einstein-Rosen bridge to consider. But of course you know this better as a wormhole. Einstein’s general theory of relativity allows for the existence of wormholes since it states that any mass curves space-time. To understand this curvature, think about two people holding a bedsheet up and stretching it tight. If one person were to place a baseball on the bedsheet, the weight of the baseball would roll to the middle of the sheet and cause the sheet to curve at that point. Now, if a marble were placed on the edge of the same bedsheet it would travel toward the baseball because of the curve. In this simplified example, space is depicted as a two-dimensional plane rather than a four-dimensional one. Imagine that this sheet is folded over, leaving a space between the top and bottom. Placing the baseball on the top side will cause a curvature to form. If an equal mass were placed on the bottom part of the sheet at a point that corresponds with the location of the baseball on the top, the second mass would eventually meet with the baseball. This is similar to how wormholes might develop. In space, masses that place pressure on different parts of the universe could combine eventually to create a kind of tunnel. This tunnel would, in theory, join two separate times and allow passage between them. Of course, it’s also possible that some unforeseen physical or quantum property prevents such a wormhole from occurring. And even if they do exist, they may be incredibly unstable. According to astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, wormholes may exist in quantum foam, the smallest environment in the universe. Here, tiny tunnels constantly blink in and out of existence, momentarily linking separate places and time like an ever-changing game of “Chutes and Ladders.” Wormholes such as these might prove too small and too brief for human time travel, but might we one day learn to capture, stabilize and enlarge them? Certainly, says Hawking, provided you’re prepared for some feedback. If we were to artificially prolong the life of a tunnel through folded space-time, a radiation feedback loop might occur, destroying the time tunnel in the same way audio feedback can wreck a speaker. Page 6/7: Cosmic String We’ve blown through black holes and wormholes, but there’s yet another possible means of time traveling via theoretic cosmic phenomena. For this scheme, we turn to physicist J. Richard Gott, who introduced the idea of cosmic string back in 1991. As the name suggests, these are stringlike objects that some scientists believe were formed in the early universe. These strings may weave throughout the entire universe, thinner than an atom and under immense pressure. Naturally, this means they’d pack quite a gravitational pull on anything that passes near them, enabling objects attached to a cosmic string to travel at incredible speeds and benefit from time dilation. By pulling two cosmic strings close together or stretching one string close to a black hole, it might be possible to warp space-time enough to create what’s called a closed timelike curve. Using the gravity produced by the two cosmic strings (or the string and black hole), a spaceship theoretically could propel itself into the past. To do this, it would loop around the cosmic strings. Quantum strings are highly speculative, however. Gott himself said that in order to travel back in time even one year, it would take a loop of string that contained half the mass-energy of an entire galaxy. In other words, you’d have to split half the atoms in the galaxy to power your time machine. And, as with any time machine, you couldn’t go back farther than the point at which the time machine was created. Oh yes, and then there are the time paradoxes. Page 7/7: Time Travel Paradoxes As we mentioned before, the concept of traveling into the past becomes a bit murky the second causality rears its head. Cause comes before effect, at least in this universe, which manages to muck up even the best-laid time traveling plans. For starters, if you traveled back in time 200 years, you’d emerge in a time before you were born. Think about that for a second. In the flow of time, the effect (you) would exist before the cause (your birth). To better understand what we’re dealing with here, consider the famous grandfather paradox. You’re a time-traveling assassin, and your target just happens to be your own grandfather. So you pop through the nearest wormhole and walk up to a spry 18-year-old version of your father’s father. You raise your laser blaster, but just what happens when you pull the trigger? Think about it. You haven’t been born yet. Neither has your father. If you kill your own grandfather in the past, he’ll never have a son. That son will never have you, and you’ll never happen to take that job as a time-traveling assassin. You wouldn’t exist to pull the trigger, thus negating the entire string of events. We call this an inconsistent causal loop. On the other hand, we have to consider the idea of a consistent causal loop. While equally thought-provoking, this theoretical model of time travel is paradox free. According to physicist Paul Davies, such a loop might play out like this: A math professor travels into the future and steals a groundbreaking math theorem. The professor then gives the theorem to a promising student. Then, that promising student grows up to be the very person from whom the professor stole the theorem to begin with. Then there’s the post-selected model of time travel, which involves distorted probability close to any paradoxical situation [source: Sanders]. What does this mean? Well, put yourself in the shoes of the time-traveling assassin again. This time travel model would make your grandfather virtually death proof. You can pull the trigger, but the laser will malfunction. Perhaps a bird will poop at just the right moment, but some quantum fluctuation will occur to prevent a paradoxical situation from taking place. But then there’s another possibility: The future or past you travel into might just be a parallel universe. Think of it as a separate sandbox: You can build or destroy all the castles you want in it, but it doesn’t affect your home sandbox in the slightest. So if the past you travel into exists in a separate timeline, killing your grandfather in cold blood is no big whoop. Of course, this might mean that every time jaunt would land you in a new parallel universe and you might never return to your original sandbox. Confused yet? Welcome to the world of time travel.
  4. Do you believe that time travel is possible? If so, why and how? Are you maybe a non-believer? Tell us why.
  5. Traveling forwards in time is surprisingly easy. Einstein’s special theory of relativity, developed in 1905, shows that time passes at different rates for people who are moving relative to one another – although the effect only becomes large when you get close to the speed of light. If one were to leave Earth in a spacecraft traveling at an appreciable fraction of light-speed, turn around and come back, only a few years might have passed on board but many years could have gone by on Earth. This is known as the “twins paradox”, since a traveller undertaking such a journey would return to find herself much younger than her twin. There’s only one problem from anyone wishing to get a glimpse of the future – getting back. It would mean traveling faster than light – and that’s not possible. Discuss Time Travel in our forums But there may be an out to be found in general relativity, Einstein’s theory of gravity that unites space and time as “space-time”, which curves in the presence of mass. It allows for the possibility of wormholes – a kind of tunnel through space-time connecting otherwise very distant parts of the universe. If the “mouths” of the wormhole are moving relative to one another, then traversing the bridge between different points in space would also take a traveler to a different point in time to that in which she started. However it would still be impossible to go back further in time than the point at which the wormhole was created, limiting the options for travel somewhat – and possibly explaining why we haven’t encountered any visitors from the future. If any natural wormholes were formed in the Big Bang, it might be possible to travel to a limited number of points in the past and in the distant universe, but wouldn’t enable one to flit around the cosmos at will as the Doctor seems to do. More restrictively still, theoretical work by Kip Thorne of Caltech using a partial unification of general relativity with quantum physics suggested that any wormhole that allows time travel would collapse as soon as it formed. Thorne did, however, resolve an apparent issue that could arise due to by time travel (within the confines of general relativity). The “grandfather paradox” involves going back in time and accidentally killing one’s grandfather before one’s father is conceived – preventing one’s own birth, making it impossible to go back in time and kill one’s grandfather. Thorne found that for point masses traversing a wormhole, no initial conditions create this type of paradox.
  6. 0 downloads

    A black & white preset with bright shadows.

    Free

  7. 0 downloads

    A warm preset with some contrasts.

    Free

  8. Oldassgeek

    War Inc.

    1 download

    DOS This requires a DOS emulator. You can get it here. War Inc. is a real-time strategy computer game developed by Optik Software. It was published by Interactive Magic on August 31, 1997. It was fairly unusual at the time in its incorporation of a rudimentary stock market, placing the player directly in control of research and development, and the ability to completely customize units by using a variety of components. War Inc. (Project Airos in Australia and Germany) received an overall rating of 66% from GameRankings from three different review sites. While it was panned as being "mediocre" for not meeting its potential by GameSpot, Game Revolution praised it for "flexibility to create a nearly unlimited variety of units".

    Free

  9. Oldassgeek

    Conan

    2 downloads

    Conan is a third-person action-adventure game with the majority of the action being real time hack and slash combat, though you also have to solve puzzles in the game. The player can acquire up to 14 different weapons and learn new fighting techniques similar to other role-playing video games. There are more than 70 levels, spanning from volcanoes to jungles, in which Conan faces 12 bosses and collects pieces of a legendary Atlantean sword. There was a multiplayer mode via Xbox Live before it went offline, where players could compete in three different game modes, play in more than 16 different maps, and had 16 different characters to play as. The events take place in the mythical era from the original books and comics known as the "Hyborian Age". When Conan sees his home village of Grannach burnt to the ground by the mysterious Vulture cult, he begins his quest for revenge against them.

    Free

  10. 1 download

    ScummVM This requires the ScummVM emulator. You can get it here. Maniac Mansion Deluxe is a superb remake of one of the best adventure games of all time. Ron Gilbert's wacky and revolutionary masterpiece comes to life as never before in this Windows version lovingly crafted by fans: sporting improved SCUMM point-and-click interface, digitized sound effects, and gorgeous 256-color VGA graphics. Created by the same team that gave us The New Adventures of Zak McKracken, LucasFan this time did not give us a new storyline, but recreated the story and gameplay of LucasFilm's original game that is 100% faithful Everything from the characters' wisecracks, object descriptions, multiple solutions, and multiple endings are all here to delight a whole new generation of adventure gamers. If you have played the original (and if you have been playing adventure games since the 1980s but never played this one, shame on you ;)), stop reading this now and go get it - you will marvel at Ron Gilbert's ingenuity all over again. If you have never played the original, you are in for a real treat. This excellent (and deservedly gushing) review at MobyGames says it all about why a game made in 1987 remains better than most adventure games made over a decade later: "Few games can claim to be a revolution in every aspect of it's genre, few games that is, aside from Maniac Mansion. From interface, to plotline, to graphics, to design, etc... MM managed to become the holy grail of adventure games and it's influence can still be felt to this day.

    Free

  11. 16 downloads

    Tuneland is a musical children's computer game, produced in 1993 by a division of 7th Level, Kids' World Entertainment. The cartoon video game follows the character Little Howie, who is voiced by the television personality Howie Mandel on an adventure around Old McDonald's Farm. The eight locations in the game are the barnyard, the farmhouse, the barn, the pond, grandma's house, the train station, the mountain, and the valley. The game contains around 40 songs, which are primarily nursery rhymes. These include "Old MacDonald", "Turkey in the Straw, "Three Blind Mice", "I'm a Little Teapot", "Itsy Bitsy Spider" and "Bingo". The CD can also be used as an audio disk or with the built in Jukebox to listen to the songs featured in the game.

    Free

  12. PCem Emulator PCem is versatile IBM PC emulator, which allows you to properly emulate a whole computer, including late 99 Pentium computer. You also get a Voodoo2 3dfx cards and many other drivers. This emulator can be very effective for Windows games until early 2000s generation. You can read this tutorial and watch these videos. Additional informations and resources can be found on Emugen. Alternatively, you can use 86Box, a forked project from PCem which supports Pentium up to MMX 300 MHz. You can watch this video tutorial. Windows 3.1 Games Some games were made for Windows 3.1 instead of DOS, you will need to install Windows 3.1 in DOSBox. You will find a copy of Windows 3.x on WinWorld. Follow these tutorial to get it running: VirtualBox forum, Vogons, Sierra Help or this blog post. Windows 95 Games Many of the Win95 games won't run on recent Windows versions, but you can install Win95 in DOSBox. The procedure is a bit complicated, hopefully dada_ and some folks over Vogons and #dosbox@freenode set up a guide to do this, check it out in the Google doc. You can also install Windows 95 in VirtualBox, follow this tutorial to do it. Another promising solution would be this project made by Felix Rieseberg, which runs on Windows, Mac and Linux. Windows 98 Games Some of the recent abandonware games were made for Windows 98. You can still get Win 98 working on your computer using VirtualBox. You will find a guide to the installation here, then a second guide to setup properly Windows. You should read BOTH of them before installing Windows 98. You can also use pre-configured Win98 VMWare images, available at WinWorld. Windows XP Games Some will work perfectly, some won't. We rarely have all the resources necessary to get these games to install and then be played. You may have to look over the web for a x64 setup file or fixed exe file. If you find a good tutorial, please post the url in the comment or drop us a message. 3dfx Games The second half of the 90s was very exciting as video games would start to benefit from 3D acceleration hardware. The 3dfx company released the Voodoo Graphics cards in 1996, which provided 3D acceleration for games that supported the technology. Performances and graphics were way ahead of the competition (Riva, Matrox, S3, ATI...) but came at a price. 3dfx released its last Voodoo card in 2000, marking the end of 3dfx supported games. Hopefully, 3dfx can be emulated nowadays using nGlide, a free 3Dfx Voodoo Glide wrapper made by Zeus Software. Very easy to use, just install and play for most games, but you should visit the compatibility page, as many games require a patch or some tweaking. Another great glide wrapper is dgVoodoo2, which allows you to play not only 3dfx games, but also DirectX (1-7) and Direct3D games. Both programs are very useful, as one may work better than the other. DirectX Games As written above, dgVoodoo2 is great for old windows games which often use DirectX. You can try these alternative also: dxwrapper, an on-going project which may prove difficult to use. WineD3D will convert DirectX to OpenGL, see the readme file in the utility folder.
  13. On a Mac computer, ISO files can be mounted without installing anything, but CUE/BIN files require DAEMON Tools Lite Mac to be mounted easily (click on the Download link next to the buy button). You can also try to rename the BIN file as an ISO file: rename "gamefile.bin" to "gamefile.iso" and open the file - it may work!
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