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Rampage is a decent PC conversion of Bally/Midway's popular arcade game. This is a side-scrolling action game for up to 3 players, in which you, mutated into a giant monster, have to trash one US city after the other. You can choose to be Ralph the Wolf, George the Big Ape, or Lizzie the Lizard. Playable, but not worth the name of the much superior arcade game.

If you have never played the arcade version, you will find Rampage a fun game that's worth a few sittings, especially if you can find friends to play with. If you have seen the arcade original, though, you'll be sorely disappointed with this release.

DOS This requires a DOS emulator. You can get it here.

 


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