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Terminator: Future Shock

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To make a video game that continues the tradition of the hard-hitting, multi-million dollar Terminator movie series, you have to combine engaging action with mind-altering special effects, gratuitous violence, and a solid storyline.

Bethesda Softworks successfully pulls together all of these elements and spits a few more in your face in Terminator: Future Shock[, the fourth game in its line of action games based on the hit movie. Future Shock, as with earlier Terminator titles from Bethesda, is a great 3D shooter that combines three types of action: walking, driving, and flying, all of which are a lot of fun to play. The 3D engine has been vastly improved from the impressive but buggy one used in Terminator: Rampage. The post-apocalyptic world you explore is filled with fires, half-buried cars, and incredibly detailed robotic enemies, including the dreaded Terminators. The game world itself is well thought-out: you can enter nearly every building to search for weapons, ammo, and med canisters as the familiar adrenaline-pumping Terminator soundtrack echoes in the background. Your arsenal range from Uzis, plasma rifles, and grenades to the trusty shotgun. The graphics, music, and sound effects are superb. You can hear Raptors (one of the most prevalent types of robot) sneaking up in packs behind you. The creepy image of a Spiderbot prancing your way should be enough to shake up even a veteran action fan. Looks aside, the real beauty of Terminator: Future Shock is its smooth control system. Using a keyboard/mouse combination, you move quickly and aim accurately as you navigate through Los Angeles. In the driving and flying modes, you're even able to travel in one direction and shoot in another, a feature that comes in very handy when you're running away.


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Oldassgeek

  

I remember this. Pretty fun... When I was young ?

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